Monday, December 31, 2012

Wedding Castle Photography straight from Wales, England

This is the image from Seth and Yvonne's wedding in England that I shot this weekend.  Yesterday we had the opportunity to do an extended couple shoot that was a blast.  It was raining and cold, but it made for dramatic skies and a wonderful time!  Hope you like it!

Next Workshops:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

Camera settings: Nikon D800, 1/80 sec at f/4.0, 16mm at ISO 2500, flash fired.  Taken at 3:26pm on December 31, 2012 by Jason Lanier.

Sunday, December 30, 2012

Guys will be....boys

This is a production still from the wedding of Seth and Yvonne that I shot at the Hard Days Night Hotel this weekend in Liverpool, England.  I was shooting the groomsmen on the balcony of the John Lennon Suite when the boys decided to do what they do best, start telling stories that can't be repeated on Facebook.  I even had a career first where I jokingly told the groom and best man to kiss, and they were more than happy to oblige (I have proof and I'm not talking about a peck).  These guys were wild, but hey, they are from West Virginia so I shouldn't be surprised!  The bride's family is from England, and those girls were a blast as well.  Can't wait to share pics!

Jason Lanier shooting a wedding in Liverpool, England

This is a production still taken at my wedding this weekend in Liverpool, England while we were trying to do the group shots.  The bride and groom (Yvonne and Seth) wanted a picture with everyone so the only way to make it happen was for us to go to the front entrance steps of the hotel!  The only problem is that we couldn't get the second swinging door to open, and this shot captures our reactions as some of the groomsmen tried to "fix" the problem!  It was an amazing wedding and I can't wait to share more pics!  Tomorrow I am going to shoot with the bride and groom all around town in Liverpool, it will be awesome!

Friday, December 28, 2012

One of my favorite Christmas Gifts Ever...

This shot was given to me by my Mom for Christmas....she's a really good photographer isn't she?  This is me shooting in the Wrangell St. Elias National Park in Alaska, and it's completely unposed...I mean it.  I waded my way into this group of tree branches that were against this lake, and I started shooting.  Meanwhile my Mom took this shot of me.  One of my favorite things is shots of me actually shooting.  Not because I love myself so much, but because when I'm old and can no longer walk and go to some of these places one day, I want to be able to see myself back in these areas doing exactly what I love....thanks Mom!!!!

Sunday, December 23, 2012

Eiffel Tower at Night Landscape by Jason Lanier

I actually grabbed this shot DURING a model shoot.  It was pretty cold outside so the I grabbed Ashley (bride) some hot chocolate to warm up.  While she was drinking it I grabbed this shot of the Eiffel Tower all lit up which I thought was just beautiful.  Shot handheld, no tripod.

Next Worshops:

http://www.workshops.jasonlanierproductions.com/

Camera settings: Nikon D800, 1/80 sec at f/4.0, 16mm at ISO 3200, flash did not fire.  Taken at 6:34pm on November 29, 2012 by Jason Lanier.

Saturday, December 22, 2012

Bridals at the Eiffel Tower...with an antique touch

This image was taken at my bridal shoot in Paris France, at the Eiffel Tower with the beautiful Ashley Rau.  It was cold outside so she brought her shawl which totally made the wedding dress even better.  I just love how she pops against the background of the Eiffel Tower....

Next Workshops:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

Camera settings: Nikon D800, 1/200 sec at f/4.0, 32mm at ISO 320, flash fired.  Taken at 3:51pm on November 29, 2012 by Jason Lanier in Paris France.

Friday, December 21, 2012

Buddha Tooth Relic Temple, Singapore

This image was taken during my trip to Singapore.  I love shooting old things like this and I love Buddhist temples. Nearly 20 years ago I lived for two years in Korea and I visited and shot the temples very often.  This temple is situated in the middle of Singapore and offers a refuge for those wanting a moment of peace.  The hardest thing about getting this shot was simply waiting for there to be no people in it.  It's really difficult to grab a shot like this because public places are so busy.  I literally waited for about 45 minutes, and only had a moment of 5 seconds to grab the shot where nobody was in it.  It was worth it.  

Next Workshops:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

Camera settings: nikon D800, 1/160 sec at f/4.0, ISO 50, flash did not fire.  Taken at 1:16pm.

Jason Lanier Shooting the Old Canning Fort in Singapore

This is a production still of me shooting at the Old Canning Fort in Singapore while I was filming an instructional video there.  It's really an amazing place and reminded me of a place where Indiana Jones would have visited (if he were real of course).  I just love old and ancient places, photographically speaking I don't care for modern places too much.  Can't wait until I can share the video with you all!

Man's Dream Bathroom, Shower Toilet Combo

I wanted to share a fun shot with you all from my travels in Singapore.  This was the bathroom in my hotel room in Singapore, and I thought it was so fun that a person (mostly men) could theoretically do two of their most favorite things at the same time, use the throne and take a relaxing shower.  All that's needed to make it complete is a waterproof newspaper!

Thursday, December 20, 2012

High ISO, Off Camera Flash, No Tripod Shoot in Chicago Park

This image was taken at my workshop in Chicago, Illinois in September.  This was towards the end of the shoot and I was shooting at a high ISO, using my SB910 set up to a Pocket Wizard and Ray Flash, with no tripod.  The point I'm trying to make is that you can create some amazing images by just using some basic equipment.  You don't always need a studio set up.  I just love using Nikon because I have so much latitude as it relates to shooting in high ISO which means I don't have to slow my shutter down to a point where I would have to put it on a tripod.  Hope you like it!

Upcoming Workshops:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

Camera settings: Nikon D800, 1/60 sec at f/4.0, 16mm at ISO 5000, flash fired.  Taken at 10:49pm on September 19, 2012 by Jason Lanier.

Only 5 days left to save 35% off of my 2013 workshops!

Use the promo code: Christmas to save 35% off my workshops for next year!  It's never been a better time to give yourself the gift of learning amazing photography.  All skill levels should feel welcome coming as you'd be amazed how beginner to pro can learn while attending one of my workshops.  

Click below to review the workshop schedule and register now!

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

We work on many things including:

  • Lighting
  • Posing
  • Composition
  • Flash
  • Shooting in Manual
  • Mastering your camera settings
  • Working with clients
  • Pushing past your current boundaries and obstacles
  • Finding your photographic "voice"

I can't wait to see you all in 2013!!!!!

Fair Photo Critique, a hate free honest place for photo critiques

Want an honest, hate free place to share your images for critique?  Tired of other photographers or even non-photographers bashing your shots for no reason?  Want feedback without the snarkiness so prevalent on social media? Well, Fair Photo Critique is your answer!

http://www.facebook.com/FairPhotoCritique

Started by award winning photographer Jason Lanier, Fair Photo Critque is a free Facebook Page that anyone can join and add their images.  You are also welcome to give your feedback on images as long as it's not nasty.  Let's just all play nice in the sandbox okay?  Fair Photo Critique is the only place Jason Lanier gives critiques on others' images, so what are you waiting for?

We also hold weekly and monthly contests with the winners entered into a competition to win a free workshop registration for a Jason Lanier Workshop!

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Eric Sartoris, Wolf in Sheep's Clothing? You be the Judge

Please, send an email to info@weddingindustryexperts.com and let them know what you think!

Recently I had the very unfortunate experience of conversing online in a public forum on Facebook with a Mr. Eric Sartoris who is a wedding photographer from Austin Texas and is part of the husband/wife team of Anthology Photography.  Eric is also a part of the International Panel of Wedding Photographers where their home page states, "We are currently inviting photographers from around the world to join this panel.  If you are an award winning photographer who owns your own business, and has a commitment to educating those who are new to the industry, we would love to hear from you.  Please send us an email: info@weddingindustryexperts.com."

Well, that's all fine and dandy until you see what Eric thinks of all newcomers, as well as his disdain for Mom's with a camera (MWAC's as he puts it), referring to Jasmine Star and Scarlett Lillian as Drag Queen's, and using extremely vile language towards me in our very public conversation.  I'll include the full sample of our conversation on Facebook and let you be the judge.  He unfortunately represents a portion of our industry that pretends to care and wants to educate, but when you get down to their roots, they show you their true very disturbing colors.

Eric was responding to a video I posted imploring Photographers to start acting in a civil manner with each other.  Especially the way older photographers treat new photographers...

Link to the my video: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4549766596710&set=vb.128578568082&type=2&theater

Here is the most vile part of his tirade:

Eric Sartoris "Jesus, Jason, you make a lame video about "Don't be a jerk", then you make a fucking douchebag post like this? Get over yourself. YOU are the biggest problem in this industry. You're fired from your hotel bellboy job, and rather than get a job as a barista at Starbucks you decide to "follow your passion" and become a photographer? Lame. Extra-lame is that, once you realize that nobody wants to hire you, the best path for you is to become a self-professed "teacher"?  You aren't fooling anyone except (obviously) the MWACs with even less knowledge than you. You do realize that the only difference between fucktards like you and the rest of the MWAC brigade is that they can actually HAVE babies, right? You deluded, condescending buffoon. STFU and make me a latte. "Back in the day"... idiot. You picked up a camera yesterday, and now YOU'RE the mentor? Look, I don't tell you how to handle luggage at the local Holiday Inn... how 'bout you save your "advice" for something YOU know about?"

The conversation in it's entirety is listed below....

  • Eric Sartoris I stopped halfway through, so maybe there was a "Sixth Sense" twist ending... but without trying to sound like a "jerk", you're wrong. Ignoring the business side of the photography business is foolish. Yes, we need to work on perfecting our craft, but business and industry trends are important to understand. Your Lexus and Michael Jackson analogies are flawed. Our business isn't at all like those: the barriers to entry into the car industry and the singing industry are monumental. On the other hand, any new mommy OR former hotel worker can become a photographer, and even TEACH it.  Sorry.  
  •    Jason Lanier Eric, I never said to ignore the business side of things...I don't know how you got that take away. Maybe you should finish watching things before you comment on them. Clearly I don't ignore the business side of things as I have a very successful workshop and photography business. You shouldn't be threatened that a new Mommy can pick up a camera and enter the market, if you are doing your thing, how does that affect you? It's almost as if photographers are upset that there aren't more barriers to entry. Does that mean that only you and others are able to enter the market? What would have happened if older photographers would have tried to force you out when you started? You shouldn't mock or demean those who are experiencing success, you should emulate them. I never feel threatened by other photographers because I focus on improving myself rather than tearing others down. No matter what industry it is, those who are focused on their own abilities (both technical and business wise) are going to be more successful than those who focus on tearing others down. You should come to one of my workshops and I'll show you what I'm talking about... Like · 4
  •    Jeff Jochum I think you clearly defined the problem, however your solution misses the point, IMHO. Instead of asking pro photogs to Stop Being Jerks so they can get a more real perspective on their positioning, consider taking the positive approach: Start Being Specialists. Newbies and KOTOGs (keepers of the old guard) are often Generalists and can't really be anything more than extensions of their cameras - which anyone can CLAIM to do. However, if instead you tie your skill at a photog to your abilities as a performer, the concept of "competition" disappears. Why? Because anyone can copy what you DO - NO ONE can copy who you ARE.  
  •    Jason Lanier Hey Jeff Jochum, I appreciate your reply. I think you offer some great advice, but for me I was simply addressing the root cause of the issue which is for photographers to start acting in a civil manner. I wasn't in any way trying to present this as a comprehensive solution but rather as a starting point to get to where you want to be. It's like breaking up a fight, before you can correct behavior you have to get the two fighting parties to just calm down....and then you move onto solutions. I think your solutions are great, and eventually my comments would incorporate your solutions and others into my advice as to how photographers can become truly successful. I'm just trying to get photogs to realize that being resentful or nasty to other photographers is truly the lowest common denominator of behavior and if they can stop doing that, they can move onto more substantive solutions for success.
    • Jeff Jochum Totally get that.  As a professional dad, I have discovered its easier to get my kids to pursue an exciting and positive result than it is to get them to simply stop unproductive behavior. I was only suggesting that, if a better world is where we want to live, we need to understand and embrace GREAT as something more than just NOT bad. Thanks for bringing this up, in the first place.  
    •    Jason Lanier Jeff, were saying similar things just in different ways. I'd always implore anyone to strive for greatness, never for mediocrity. This message is meant to be very simple...photographers need to start behaving better and treating their colleagues and newcomers with respect if we are going to thrive as an industry..  
    •    Eric Sartoris Why?    
    •    Jeanine Weinert Murray I loved this! I have been self teaching myself for 2 years and it's been a struggle to learn and get answers to my questions through other photographers. I get ignored, or a vague answer that doesn't answer my question by other photographers. It has been so disheartening. I was like a kid at Christmas when I booked my trip to the WPPI conference. It's like, finally someone is going to be WILLING to help me! Thank you for posting this! 7 hours ago via mobile · Unlike · 2
    •    Jason Lanier Jeanine, just read Eric's comments and realize that a lot of photographers (not all) are threatened by newcomers and choose to wallow in negativity and mediocrity rather than acting like professionals. Back in the day all masters would mentor apprentices and as an industry we need to adopt that concept much better if we are going to thrive, not just survive. Even if you choose not to help, at least treat others with respect so others will respect you. Photographers like Eric (at least according to his comments) are precisely the biggest problem we face as an industry. I like to call it the iPod/iPhone phenomenon...there are a million MP3 players on the market and all of them are cheaper than an Apple product, yet the Apple products sell the most....why? Because they are the best. Apple doesn't spend time beating up its competitors in its commercials, it simply tells you how awesome they are. It's an unbelievably simple concept that many don't want to accept because their own product just isn't that good...that's why they are threatened. It's pretty sad, but very true. Misery loves company...look me up when you come to WPPI, I'll show you what a true professional really is..  
    •    Jeanine Weinert Murray Are you teaching a class? How do I find you?    
    •    Jason Lanier Jeanine, just shoot me an email at jason@jlpros.com and I'll give you my contact info. I'm attending the conference and teaching a 2 day workshop that week in Las Vegas like I did last year. It's gonna be a blast!

Backlighting to get amazing results

This image was taken at my workshop in Chicago back in September of this year.  I used an off camera flash hooked up to a Pocket Wizard to light the back, and a video light for the front...pretty cool huh?

Next Workshops:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

Camera settings: Nikon D800, 1/100 sec at f/4.0, 35mm at ISO 400, flash fired.  Taken at 8:54pm on September 19, 2012 by Jason Lanier.

Social Media using photographer's images for their own benefit

Instragram reverses it's decision to use their users images for their own advertising.  While I think this is a temporary win for all of us, I think it's only a matter of time before Facebook, Blogs, etc. try and utilize our artwork for their gain.  Be smart and watermark your images, so if they do use them, you get the credit you deserve...

 

http://blog.instagram.com/post/38252135408/thank-you-and-were-listening

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Differentiating yourself from the competition, using macro lenses

I get asked frequently which lenses are the most important to buy.  Well, that depends a lot upon what you shoot.  For a wedding photographer a macro lens is a must.  I know they're expensive, and I know they are fairly one dimensional when it comes to wedding photography as they would primarily be used for jewelry shots, small details etc.  But the results are beautiful.  Your work must stand out if you are going to be successful.  

We have so many discussions on my Page about newcomer photographers taking away business etc.  Any newcomer shooting in Auto with a kit lens couldn't remotely in their wildest dreams recreate this shot.  There is so much more than gear that goes into great photography.  But conversely without great gear, you are letting your experience and knowledge be wasted if you're using crappy gear for your shots.  You need it all to truly differentiate yourself from your competition.  

Next Workshops:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

Camera settings: Nikon D800, 1/60 sec at f/4.5, 105mm at ISO 125, flash did not fire.  Taken at 12:22pm on November 17, 2012 by Jason Lanier.

Monday, December 17, 2012

Shooting with Dynamic Backgrounds

This image was taken in St. Ybor during my workshop there in November of this year.  They have such amazing murals in this tiny little town, and it was truly awesome to be able to utilize these for our benefit.  We had the amazing model Constance wearing a beautiful black dress which was important because we needed a high contrast point against this very colorful background.  Hope you guys like it!

Next Workshops:

http://www.eventbrite.com/org/1864370877

Camera settings: Nikon D700, 1/125 sec at f/5.6, 62mm at ISO 320, flash did not fire.  Taken at 3:23pm on November 14, 2012 by Jason Lanier.

Exposing a Hater...I can't make this stuff up, and I can't believe people act like this on a public forum like Facebook

This is a transcript from a few photographers who commented on my video from a Facebook Group for WPPI.  When I tell you that photographers are threatened I'm not just saying it, it's true.  As the conversation goes, Eric Sartoris shows how truly classless he is by making fun of me, Mom's Scarlett Lillian, Jasmine Starr, etc.  He is precisely the type of individual that newcomers have such a hard time with.  Go and check out his work and draw your own conclusions, I know I've certainly drawn mine...

  • Eric Sartoris I stopped halfway through, so maybe there was a "Sixth Sense" twist ending... but without trying to sound like a "jerk", you're wrong. Ignoring the business side of the photography business is foolish. Yes, we need to work on perfecting our craft, but business and industry trends are important to understand. Your Lexus and Michael Jackson analogies are flawed. Our business isn't at all like those: the barriers to entry into the car industry and the singing industry are monumental. On the other hand, any new mommy OR former hotel worker can become a photographer, and even TEACH it. 

    Sorry.
     
  •  
    Jason Lanier Eric, I never said to ignore the business side of things...I don't know how you got that take away. Maybe you should finish watching things before you comment on them. Clearly I don't ignore the business side of things as I have a very successful workshop and photography business. You shouldn't be threatened that a new Mommy can pick up a camera and enter the market, if you are doing your thing, how does that affect you? It's almost as if photographers are upset that there aren't more barriers to entry. Does that mean that only you and others are able to enter the market? What would have happened if older photographers would have tried to force you out when you started? You shouldn't mock or demean those who are experiencing success, you should emulate them. I never feel threatened by other photographers because I focus on improving myself rather than tearing others down. No matter what industry it is, those who are focused on their own abilities (both technical and business wise) are going to be more successful than those who focus on tearing others down. You should come to one of my workshops and I'll show you what I'm talking about...
    Like · 4
  •  
    Jeff Jochum I think you clearly defined the problem, however your solution misses the point, IMHO. Instead of asking pro photogs to Stop Being Jerks so they can get a more real perspective on their positioning, consider taking the positive approach: Start Being Specialists. Newbies and KOTOGs (keepers of the old guard) are often Generalists and can't really be anything more than extensions of their cameras - which anyone can CLAIM to do. However, if instead you tie your skill at a photog to your abilities as a performer, the concept of "competition" disappears. Why? Because anyone can copy what you DO - NO ONE can copy who you ARE.
     
  •  
    Jason Lanier Hey Jeff Jochum, I appreciate your reply. I think you offer some great advice, but for me I was simply addressing the root cause of the issue which is for photographers to start acting in a civil manner. I wasn't in any way trying to present this as a comprehensive solution but rather as a starting point to get to where you want to be. It's like breaking up a fight, before you can correct behavior you have to get the two fighting parties to just calm down....and then you move onto solutions. I think your solutions are great, and eventually my comments would incorporate your solutions and others into my advice as to how photographers can become truly successful. I'm just trying to get photogs to realize that being resentful or nasty to other photographers is truly the lowest common denominator of behavior and if they can stop doing that, they can move onto more substantive solutions for success.
    • Jeff Jochum Totally get that.  As a professional dad, I have discovered its easier to get my kids to pursue an exciting and positive result than it is to get them to simply stop unproductive behavior. I was only suggesting that, if a better world is where we want to live, we need to understand and embrace GREAT as something more than just NOT bad. Thanks for bringing this up, in the first place.
       
    •  
      Jason Lanier Jeff, were saying similar things just in different ways. I'd always implore anyone to strive for greatness, never for mediocrity. This message is meant to be very simple...photographers need to start behaving better and treating their colleagues and newcomers with respect if we are going to thrive as an industry..
       
    •  
       
       
    •  
      Jeanine Weinert Murray I loved this! I have been self teaching myself for 2 years and it's been a struggle to learn and get answers to my questions through other photographers. I get ignored, or a vague answer that doesn't answer my question by other photographers. It has been so disheartening. I was like a kid at Christmas when I booked my trip to the WPPI conference. It's like, finally someone is going to be WILLING to help me! Thank you for posting this!
      7 hours ago via mobile · Unlike · 2
    •  
      Jason Lanier Jeanine, just read Eric's comments and realize that a lot of photographers (not all) are threatened by newcomers and choose to wallow in negativity and mediocrity rather than acting like professionals. Back in the day all masters would mentor apprentices and as an industry we need to adopt that concept much better if we are going to thrive, not just survive. Even if you choose not to help, at least treat others with respect so others will respect you. Photographers like Eric (at least according to his comments) are precisely the biggest problem we face as an industry. I like to call it the iPod/iPhone phenomenon...there are a million MP3 players on the market and all of them are cheaper than an Apple product, yet the Apple products sell the most....why? Because they are the best. Apple doesn't spend time beating up its competitors in its commercials, it simply tells you how awesome they are. It's an unbelievably simple concept that many don't want to accept because their own product just isn't that good...that's why they are threatened. It's pretty sad, but very true. Misery loves company...look me up when you come to WPPI, I'll show you what a true professional really is..
       
    •  
      Jeanine Weinert Murray Are you teaching a class? How do I find you?
       
       
    •  
      Jason Lanier Jeanine, just shoot me an email at jason@jlpros.com and I'll give you my contact info. I'm attending the conference and teaching a 2 day workshop that week in Las Vegas like I did last year. It's gonna be a blast!
      • Eric Sartoris Jesus, Jason, you make a lame video about "Don't be a jerk", then you make a fucking douchebag post like this? Get over yourself. YOU are the biggest problem in this industry. You're fired from your hotel bellboy job, and rather than get a job as a barista at Starbucks you decide to "follow your passion" and become a photographer? Lame. Extra-lame is that, once you realize that nobody wants to hire you, the best path for you is to become a self-professed "teacher"? 

        You aren't fooling anyone except (obviously) the MWACs with even less knowledge than you. You do realize that the only difference between fucktards like you and the rest of the MWAC brigade is that they can actually HAVE babies, right?

        You deluded, condescending buffoon. STFU and make me a latte. "Back in the day"... idiot. You picked up a camera yesterday, and now YOU'RE the mentor? Look, I don't tell you how to handle luggage at the local Holiday Inn... how 'bout you save your "advice" for something YOU know about?

         
      •  
        Jeff Jochum I'm not going to get in the middle, and popped in just to set a record straight on Apple as a model of civility in advertising. Actually, not so much,http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2B73A382291A18C5
        www.youtube.com
        All Mac vs PC Commercials All From Apple.com All Property of Apple Inc No Copyright Infringement Intended Remember To Get a Mac!
         
      •  
        Jason Lanier Eric, thank you for making my point. Your response was the epitome of unprofessional. You are clueless as to my background, and you clearly have hostility towards Mom's in that you've chosen to mention them derisively twice in your posts. I've shot professionally in 6 continents in the past 5 years and just within the past 30 days I've done professional shoots in France and Germany, and conclude the year with a wedding in England. I don't teach because I can't book business, I teach because I love it. I'm sorry you have so much hostility towards your competition, or even worse yet, those who might be beneath you. I have taught workshops for 2 years and have hundreds of students across the United States. My testimonials speak for themselves. Believe me when I say, the vast majority my workshop attendees including MWAC's (Mom's with a camera as you derisively put it) could teach you plenty. You're just bitter, and it's sad. Get educated my brother and stop hating on others. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jason-Lanier-Photography/128578568082
        Based out of Southern California, Jason Lanier shoots all over the world as a we...See More
        Page: 4,796 like 
        •  
          Jason Lanier Jeff Jochum, the point I was making was that you've never seen an iPod commercial comparing it to a Zune for example. I'm not going to play a game of gotcha on here, because my point remains the same and I'm not here to promote or defend Apple. I just came on to make the point that when you are focused on your own excellence, the failures of others becomes meaningless. If you are focused on the failures of others it means you haven't come to terms with your own.
           
        •  
          Eric Sartoris It's clear that you're focused on YOU, Jason. You have a pretty high opinion of yourself, too, for some reason. One of the problems here, though, is that you made a VIDEO, yet you have a face made more for RADIO. You're like a poor-man's Jasmine Star or Scarlett Lillian, but without the drag-queen appeal. 

          Forgetting, for the moment, your lack of business acumen (since your Michael Jackson and Yugo and Apple analogies were ALL 100% off-base) , it's your complete lack of any sort of LOGIC skills that has us laughing. Even if you ignore Apple's world famous "I'm a Mac...I'm a PC" commercials, you ALSO don't see them holding bullshit "workshops" teaching their competitors how to make computers and iPods. They are highly secretive about their business practices... as are most other successful companies. 

          You, on the other hand, have seemingly hit upon a novel way to chat with The Ladies. Simply put yourself out there as a Dale Carnegie/Dale Earnhardt hybrid, and wait for the fives and tens of desperate MWACs to look up to your massive... um... photographic seminar expertise. How's that working out for you?

          Okay, so you're a legend in your own mind. But dude, please, no more videos. You look like a thumb, and your so-called "positive attitude" really needs to be polished. Whoever this "mystery photographer" is who prompted you to make your whiney YouTube masterpiece probably just hit a nerve. 

          But it looks like he was right.